Structural/Congenital Heart Disease | Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute
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Structural/Congenital
Heart Disease

Structural/Congenital Heart Disease

Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute provides screening, diagnosis, prevention and treatment services for structural and congenital heart disease. Our physicians work with you to help you manage and treat the disease before it has serious consequences. Our goal is to improve your health and quality of life.

Some mild congenital heart defects require no immediate treatment, while others require medication. People with more-serious conditions may need more intervention. When appropriate, Institute physicians can perform the following percutaneous – meaning done via needle-puncture of the skin – procedures using a catheter to implant a corrective device into the affected area of your heart:

  • Percutaneous patent foramen ovale (PFO) - A tiny flap in the area separating the upper right and left heart chambers. A repair procedure closes a PFO.
  • Percutaneous atrial septal defect (ASD) - A hole located in the walls between the heart’s atria. A repair procedure seals an ASD.
  • Percutaneous ventricular septal defect (VSD) - An opening in the dividing wall (septum) between the two lower chambers of the heart, known as the right and left ventricles. A repair procedure seals a VSD.
  • Percutaneous left atrial appendage - A thumb-sized pouch located on top of your heart. Closure of the pouch may help to prevent blood clots that can form in the pouch from entering your blood stream and causing a stroke. A closure procedure implants a device just behind or at the opening of the left atrial appendage to form a seal. Other closure methods include tying off the appendage like a lasso.   

These procedures are similar to angioplasty. In each instance, an interventional cardiologist uses a catheter to implant a corrective device into the affected area. This requires a tiny incision in your groin. In contrast with traditional open heart surgery, this method offers patients quicker recovery, a shorter hospital stay and less pain and scarring.


Heart Surgery

Institute physicians also can repair some structural heart defects using robotic surgery. This minimally invasive technique allows access to the heart through small incisions. The robotic surgery system’s high-resolution camera and multidimensional images give surgeons a better view of your heart.

If your structural heart condition cannot be corrected with minimally invasive techniques, our specialists offer more-traditional surgical options to get you back on the road to good health.

Robot-assisted Heart Surgery
Some structural heart defects are corrected using robot-assisted surgery. This technique allows the surgeon to access the heart through small incisions no wider than a thumb. The surgeon maneuvers a da Vinci robot’s arms to repair the defect, thereby avoiding the need for open heart surgery.

The da Vinci’s high-resolution camera and multidimensional images give surgeons a better view of the heart. Using robotic technology, surgeons can zoom in and out to magnify views. Truly a minimally invasive procedure, robotic surgery is another advantage available to Institute patients.

I
f your congenital heart defect cannot be corrected with minimally invasive techniques, our specialists offer other surgical options to get you back on the road to good health. 

If your structural heart condition cannot be corrected with minimally invasive techniques, our specialists offer more-traditional surgical options to get you back on the road to good health.​

The care team at the Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute encourages all patients and family members to learn more about conditions and diseases that affect the heart and overall cardiovascular system. The links below provide more information about heart conditions and diseases that might be treated within this program.

Heart Murmurs
Heart murmurs may be caused by a number of factors or diseases.

Heart Valve Diseases
Heart valve disorders can arise from two main types of malfunctions, regurgitation and stenosis.

Mitral Valve Prolapse
Mitral valve prolapse, also known as click-murmur syndrome, Barlow's syndrome, balloon mitral valve or floppy valve syndrome, is the bulging of one or both of the mitral valve flaps (leaflets) into the left atrium during the contraction of the heart.

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To help in the diagnosis of your structural or congenital heart disease, your physician may request that you have one or more of the following tests:

  • Echocardiogram
  • Transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE)
  • Angiogram
  • Cardiac MRI
  • Computed tomography (CT) angiogram
  • Magnetic resonance angiogram
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The Institute’s commitment to providing you with the best possible care means we also conduct research on the latest devices and other advances to treat structural heart disease.

Dilated Cardiomyopathy and Genetics

DCM Research Project
This collaborative, family-based study with Ohio State University is aimed at identifying the genes responsible for dilated cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this study is to identify gene changes that cause DCM and the gene differences that influence the development and severity of DCM. Principal Investigator: Francisco Javier Jimenez-Carcamo, M.D. (Active Enrollment)
Co-Investigator: Hakop Hrachian-Haftvani, M.D.

Structural Heart Disease

REALISM – Registry: MitraClip vs. Surgery for Mitral Valve Regurgitation EVEREST II: Real World Expanded Multi-center Study of the MitraClip System (REALISM)
Principal Investigator: Ramon Quesada, M.D. (Active Follow-up)

PERCEVAL Study: Clinical Investigation of the Perceval S Sutureless Heart Valve
Principal Investigator: Alvaro Montoya, M.D. (Active Enrollment)

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