FAQs | Baptist Hospital http://bapth.lt/1Yzolbv
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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions:

 

  • Baptist Hospital Information
  • Breastfeeding
  • Classes & Support Groups
  • Labor Questions
  • Nursery
  • Pediatrician Questions
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    Baptist Hospital

     

    1. Q:What are the hospital visiting hours & policies?
    10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. and all visitors must present photo ID. This is strictly enforced for the safety of all our moms and babies. If your visitors do not have a photo ID, they will not be allowed on the floor.

     2. Q:  How many visitors can I have in my room?
     
    A:  In triage, you can have one person of your choice with you. In the labor room, you can have a total of 3 people with you. If you deliver by Cesarean section, you can have one person with you. Due to the surgical environment, this person will not be able to switch out with other family members. Once you are transferred to post-partum unit on Mother-Baby, you can have up to 4 people in the room.  

    3. Q:  What if my baby is born early? What if my baby has special needs?
    A:  Most babies are healthy when they are born, but should your baby need specialized care and observation, he/she will be admitted to our George Batchelor and Gloria Vasta Lewis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Here, a team of highly skilled physicians, called neonatologists, and specially trained neonatal nurses will care for your baby. Baptist Children's Hospital is one of only a few hospitals in Miami-Dade County to have a Level III NICU to care for the tiniest and sickest babies. Parents may and are encouraged to participate in their infant's care as much as the baby's condition allows.

    4. Q:  When are neonatologists available if my baby has special needs?
    A:  Most babies are healthy when they are born, but should your baby need specialized care and observation, he/she will be admitted to our
    George Batchelor and Gloria Vasta Lewis Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Here, a team of highly skilled physicians, called neonatologists, and specially trained neonatal nurses will care for your baby. Baptist Children's Hospital is one of only a few hospitals in Miami Dade County to have a Level III NICU to care for the tiniest and sickest babies.

    5. Q:  I have special cultural needs - who can I talk to?
    A: Your cultural needs will be assessed on admission to the hospital. Please discuss your individual needs with you healthcare providers. 

    6. Q:  What is triage?
    A: The triage area is where a nurse will check your contractions, see how far you are dilated, check your baby's heart rate and be in contact with your physician.  Triage is your only non-private room during your stay at Baptist.  If you are in active labor, you will be transported to the Labor and Delivery area.  If you are not in active labor, you may be sent home, at the discretion of your physician. 

    7. Q:  Can I have flowers delivered to me while I am in the hospital?
    A: You may have flowers delivered to you while in the hospital. As there is limited surface area, some flower arrangements may need to be taken home prior to your discharge from the hospital. For the safety of those with allergies, latex balloons and lilies are not allowed in the hospital.

    8. Q:  Is Wi-fi available?
    A: Yes, our facility is Wi-fi accessible.

    9. Q:  Can I take pictures or use my video camera
    A: Most families want to capture this special event on video or photographs. For the safety and security of our mother, babies, staff and physicians, we ask that you follow the guidelines outlined in the Healthy Beginnings packet.  You should have received this packet from your doctor and it is also available on the Baptist Health South Florida website. BaptistHealth.net/childbirth 

    10. Q: How do I register to deliver at the hospital?
    A:  When it's time to have your baby, paperwork will be the last thing on your mind. Baptist Hospital has a pre-admission packet containing all you'll need to arrange for your maternity stay. You can obtain this packet from your doctor or by calling the maternity pre-admitting coordinator at 786-596-5959. The packet is also available online at BaptistHealth.net/childbirth. Please read the material carefully, complete all forms and mail them, along with a copy of your insurance card, to our maternity pre-admitting office. It's best to register as early as possible in your pregnancy. Please review the information provided in this packet as it will also provide answers to many of your questions.  It is recommended to have all your pre-admitting paperwork in by your 6th month.

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    Breastfeeding

    1. Q:  When should I first try nursing my baby?
    A: This may depend on the type of delivery. If a healthy baby is delivered vaginally, we recommend breastfeeding as soon as possible after delivery. If you deliver by Cesarean section, you can start breastfeeding as soon as you and the baby are transferred to your post-partum room on the Mother-Baby unit.

    2. Q: Who will help me with breastfeeding?
    A:  While you are in the hospital, our specially trained mother baby nurses are available to help you and your baby with breastfeeding. Our Lactation Services staff is also available to support you and your breastfeeding goals. After you go home, schedule a private appointment with one of our Lactation Consultants.  There is a fee for this service. Please call 786-596-2671 to schedule an appointment. 

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    Classes & Support Groups

    1. Q:  Are prenatal classes available at the hospital?
    A:  Yes, we offer a variety of childbirth education classes to suit your schedule. Information about our classes is available in your Healthy Beginnings packet. You can also access our class information on our website, BaptistHealth.net/childbirtheducation. Should you have any additional questions, you can e-mail us at BaptistChildbirth@BaptistHealth.net or speak to our class registrar at 786-596-8748, weekdays, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

    2. Q:  What support groups are available?
    A:  For information regarding our free breastfeeding support group, please call our Perinatal Services and Lactation department at 786-596-2671The Breastfeeding Support Group meets the first Wednesday of the month at The Health Resource Center, 8950 North Kendall Drive, Suite 105, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. As the date, time and location are subject to change, we encourage you to call our office for the most updated information. South Miami Hospital also has "Baby's First Year," a free support group for new moms. This support group meets the first and third Friday of the month.

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    Labor Questions

    1 Q:  Where do I go if I think I am in labor?
    A:  If you think you are in labor, notify your obstetrician/physician. You will need to be checked in the triage area of Labor and Delivery. Triage is located on the second floor of the Lake Pavilion Building. Please take the virtual tour to familiarize yourself with the campus.  

    2. Q:  What if I have any problems or complications during my pregnancy? Where do I go for treatment?
    A:  If you are experiencing any obstetrical complications during your pregnancy, please notify your physician.  Your doctor may instruct you to go to the Emergency Department or triage depending on the number of weeks of pregnancy or the nature of your complication.  Follow the signs and lettering on the hospital campus to get to the Emergency department.  Triage is located on the second floor on the Lake Pavilion Building.

    3 Q:  Will I be able to walk or use my birthing ball when I am in labor?
    A:  We encourage you to discuss this with your physician as you will want to be familiar with your doctor's practices.

    4 Q: What is a doula? Can I have one present when I am in labor? Does she count as one of my visitors?
    A:  A birth doula is someone who is trained and experienced in childbirth who provides physical, emotional and informational support to the mother and her partner before, during and just after delivery. The role of the doula is to provide non-medical support to the mother and her partner.  Your doula will count as one of your visitors.

    5. Q:  When will my doctor give me anesthesia?
    A:  Epidural anesthesia is used to minimize maternal discomfort during the labor and delivery process.  It requires an order form from an obstetrician and is initiated by the anesthesia professional.  Our staff is required to complete an assessment including an explanation of the procedure, patient screening and obtain informed consent prior to administration of anesthesia.  Please discuss your desires and expectations with your physician. 

    6. Q:  Will I be able to eat in labor? How soon will I be able to eat after the baby is born?
    A:  While in labor, it is recommended that you have only ice chips. The presence of food in the stomach may cause nausea and vomiting. In the event you should need anesthesia for your labor, vomiting could cause aspiration of food to the lungs, a condition that is dangerous to you. If you deliver vaginally, you will be able to eat once your recovery is complete.  If you deliver by Cesarean section, you may feel nauseous.  Our staff in recovery and Mother-Baby encourages nothing by mouth for at least six hours after delivery.  You will be given ice chips initially and your diet will be advanced as tolerated.

    7. Q:  How soon will I be able to hold my baby after birth? 
    A:  A healthy baby can be placed with its mother within minutes of birth. We encourage you to have skin-to-skin contact with your baby soon after birth. If you have any special requests, please make sure to discuss these with your physician and labor nurses prior to delivery.

    8. Q:  What if I am considered a high risk delivery?
    A:  Our highly skilled staff is trained to care for you and your baby. We are equipped to care for your needs as a high-risk mother. Our Progressive Care Unit (PCU) has been designed to accommodate mothers who are in need of frequent monitoring. 

    9. Q:  What is a fetal monitor? Do you have wireless monitors in the labor rooms?
    A:  The fetal monitor is used to determine the baby's well-being prior to birth.  It provides a continuous printed record for the evaluation of uterine activity and the baby's heart response.  Your obstetrician may decide to use an external or internal monitor. Baptist Hospital does have wireless monitors. These monitors are used when appropriate and available. 

    10. Q:  We have decided to save the cord blood. When should we bring the cord blood kit?
    A:  Please review all the information and forms that come with your kit. Some of the forms may require your doctor's signature. As there are different kits available, you will want to make sure your doctor is familiar with the one you have chosen. Provide your kit to your nurse upon admission to Labor and Delivery.   Ask your nurse about information on public cord banking.

    11. Q:  Do you have a Jacuzzi?
    A:  Use of the Jacuzzi is based on room availability. In early labor, some patients enjoy relaxing in the Jacuzzi. Use of the Jacuzzi will depend on many circumstances revolving around your labor. Your physician will need to approve its use. 

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    Nursery

    1. Q:How much bonding time will we have before my baby goes to the admitting nursery?
    A:  The newborn baby will need eye drops and treatment with Vitamin K in the nursery within the first hour of birth. A healthy baby can stay with mom up until the time the nurse needs to take the baby to the nursery to begin this treatment. If you deliver by Cesarean section, you will be able to see your baby before he is taken to the nursery. 

    2. Q:  Who will go with my baby to the admitting nursery?
    A:  Whoever you choose as your significant other and the nurse will accompany the baby to the admitting nursery. Your family will be able to see the newborn baby from the nursery window. The nurses in the admit nursery will give your significant other additional information. 

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    Pediatrician Questions

    1. Q:What does it mean that our pediatrician needs to be "on staff" at the hospital?
    A: The doctor you have chosen to care for your baby will need to have privileges to practice at Baptist Hospital. We offer assistance through our Physician Referral Services if you need help in your selection of a pediatrician or other healthcare provider. They can be reached at 786-596-6557Monday through Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. In the event that your pediatrician does not have privileges at the hospital, our neonatologists will tend to your infant's care until you are discharged to go home. You will be instructed when to follow-up with your pediatrician.

    2. Q:Who will notify my pediatrician when my baby is born?
    A:  Once the baby is born, our nursery staff will notify your pediatrician of choice of the baby's birth. Please make sure that you have the pediatrician's name and office phone number with you. If your pediatrician is unable to see the baby for the initial assessment, she/he may opt to transfer care of the baby to the neonatologist. The neonatologist will tend to your infant's care until you are discharged to go home. You will be instructed when to follow-up with your pediatrician.

    3. Q:  When does our pediatrician need to examine my baby?
    A: Upon notification of the baby's birth, the pediatrician will make arrangements to see your baby and perform the initial assessment.  This initial assessment usually takes place within 24 hours of the baby's birth. 

    4. Q:  What should I do if I don't have a pediatrician?
    A:In the excitement of pregnancy, some parents forget a very important task: choosing a pediatrician for their baby. Your can get referrals from friends and family, your health insurance plan or your obstetrician. We also offer assistance through our Physician Referral Services if you need help in your selection of a pediatrician or other healthcare provider. They can be reached at 786-596-6657Monday through Friday, 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

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