As the volume of patients with COVID-19 continues to challenge healthcare organizations, Baptist Health South Florida is turning to an innovative solution to keep patients where they feel most comfortable — at home.

Partnering with Masimo, a medical technology company that specializes in remote patient management solutions, Baptist Health is sending patients with COVID-19 home, where they can be monitored 24-hours-a-day by the staff at Baptist Health’s Telehealth Center.

Highly-trained, critical care staff are able to track key vital signs, such as oxygen saturation, respiration rate and pulse rate, through a device placed on the patient’s finger and wrist. In case of any clinical deterioration, the team at Baptist Health can contact the patient for further information and take appropriate action if the patient needs to return to the hospital.

(Watch video now: Eduardo Martinez-Dubouchet, M.D., director of Telehealth and medical director of the eICU at Baptist Health South Florida, explains how COVID-19 patients are being monitored remotely.)

The use of this remote technology enables patients that do not need acute care to recover at home while freeing up hospital space for those that need critical care. The implementation of this program was made possible by the Baptist Health Foundation, which has funded the Masimo devices as well as prepaid cell phones for those patients that needed a connection to be able to monitor their progress at home.

“This is what Baptist Health Foundation is here to do – We support our patients, staff and community to make sure everyone is cared for with not only expertise and innovation, but also with compassion,” said Alex Villoch, chief executive officer of the Baptist Health Foundation. “None of this would be possible without the support of our generous donors. We are abundantly grateful,” Villoch added.

Generosity Heals

Your donation to Baptist Health Foundation will ensure we are able to provide life-saving care now and into the future.

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