Because of the coronavirus pandemic, going to the hospital or emergency room now means getting screened at the entry and, once inside, following strict safety guidelines that include social distancing, wearing masks, and other measures meant to protect patients and staff alike.

Jonathan Fialkow, M.D., director
Jonathan A. Fialkow, M.D., deputy
medical director and chief of
cardiology, Miami Cardiac & Vascular
Institute, and chief population health
officer for Baptist Health South
Florida.

Now, the screening process at entry points has been enhanced with the addition of new automated temperature screening kiosks at all Baptist Health South Florida hospitals, emergency rooms, urgent care centers and other facilities.

“With automated, non-contact temperature screening, you simply step up to the device and in less than a second, it lets you know if you have a fever,” says Jonathan Fialkow, M.D., deputy medical director, chief of cardiology at Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute and chief population health officer for Baptist Health South Florida. “The technology is completely safe and accurate. It will even remind you to place your mask on.”

Baptist Health has installed automatic
temperature screening devices at all of
its facilities throughout South Florida

The installation of automated temperature screeners is just one example of the lengths Baptist Health has gone to in order to keep patients and staff safe during the pandemic. Dr. Fialkow says investing in the automated temperature scanners was an easy decision for the health system, which has 10 hospitals and more than 50 outpatient centers from the Florida Keys up to Palm Beach County.

“Nothing is more important than the safety and wellbeing of our patients and our employees,” Dr. Fialkow adds. “These automated screening devices are helping us keep our hospitals safe for everyone, with the added benefit of streamlining the entry process. We want people to know it’s safe for them to seek care at every one of our facilities.”

Doctors from almost every specialty at Baptist Health and across the country have reported a steep drop in patients during the pandemic as some people delay care because they’re afraid of exposure to COVID-19.

Dr. Fialkow advises people to be proactive about their health. “Keep up with your diagnostics, your annual exams, and your flu shots, wear a mask whenever you go out, and by all means if you have a serious illness or injury, call 911 or get to the hospital immediately,” he says.  “We’re ready to care for you.”

Concerned you may have coronavirus?
Use our online Coronavirus Assessment tool or call our COVID-19 hotline, 1-833-MYBAPTIST (833-692-2784). To see a doctor on your phone from the comfort and safety of your home, download Baptist Health Care On Demand.

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