Baptist Health Acquires Sophisticated New Platform for Brain Tumor Treatments

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June 27, 2022


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Always seeking to further the level of care available to cancer patients in the region, Baptist Health South Florida has added a sophisticated new radiosurgery platform to its arsenal of cancer-fighting technology. The ZAP-X® Gyroscopic Radiosurgery® platform for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) will be used by Miami Neuroscience Institute, in collaboration with Miami Cancer Institute, to treat advanced brain tumors, executives of the health system say.

Michael W. McDermott, M.D., neurosurgeon and chief medical executive of Miami Neuroscience Institute

Installation of the technology is expected to begin later this year, says Michael W. McDermott, M.D., neurosurgeon and chief medical executive of Miami Neuroscience Institute, which, along with Miami Cancer Institute, is part of Baptist Health. Dr. McDermott says the two centers are dedicated to offering the most innovative and advanced techniques to diagnose and treat brain disorders and tumors.

As a non-invasive treatment for many primary and metastatic brain tumors, SRS is a well-established procedure, according to Dr. McDermott. “SRS often provides equivalent to superior outcomes compared to surgery, yet requires no incision and is painless,” he says, adding that SRS is typically delivered in one to five brief outpatient visits and patients often return to normal activity the same day.

According to the company’s website, ZAP-X was designed to transform modern radiosurgery with a ground-breaking gyroscopic design which delivers hundreds of uniquely angled radiation beams precisely sculpted to the unique contours of targeted lesions. This novel capability aims to enhance patient outcomes by potentially improving the ability to avoid critical structures such as the brain stem, eyes, and optic nerves, while also lowering healthy brain tissue exposure to preserve patient cognitive function.

The ZAP-X® Gyroscopic Radiosurgery® platform for cranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) will be used by Miami Neuroscience Institute, in collaboration with Miami Cancer Institute, to treat advanced brain tumors

“When treating the brain, particularly with a procedure as complex as radiosurgery, the technology and precision must be exquisite,” Dr. McDermott explains. “ZAP-X is the latest advance in SRS, and the first new dedicated radiosurgery technology platform in over 30 years. This innovation enables our center to offer patients the highest level of care.”

ZAP-X is recognized for being the first and only vault-free SRS delivery system, thereby eliminating the need for providers to build costly shielded radiation treatment rooms. This unique feature also allows clinicians to remain immediately adjacent to the patient during treatment, in contrast to the long-standing practice of patients being sequestered in a shielded delivery suite during therapy.

Minesh Mehta, M.D., deputy director and chief of radiation oncology at Miami Cancer Institute

Utilizing a modern linear accelerator to produce radiation, ZAP-X is also the first and only dedicated radiosurgery system to no longer require Cobalt-60 radioactive sources, consequently eliminating the significant efforts and costs to host, secure and regularly replace radioactive isotopes.

“Miami Cancer Institute is in the unique position of having access to virtually every radiation delivery technology available,” says Minesh Mehta, M.D., the Institute’s deputy director and chief of radiation oncology. “This allows our team to align each patient with a tailored therapy and technology for highly individualized indications and needs. We look forward to ZAP-X further complementing our portfolio of therapeutic solutions.”

To facilitate rapid installation, ZAP-X will initially be located within a temporary facility and will soon migrate to the new Miami Neuroscience Institute building at Baptist Health South Florida’s Dadeland campus, Dr. McDermott says.

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